Mornum Time Press
Mornum Time Press

Alexander Technique Publications

Thinking Aloud by Walter Carrington

Thinking Aloud by Walter Carrington

19.50 26.00

by Walter Carrington

Designed by Marianne Ackerman

Hardcover, 176 pages, ISBN 0-9644352-0-9, 

 

 

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About the Book

Thinking Aloud is a serious exploration of the Alexander Technique that goes beyond the standard introductions to this educational method. Walter Carrington, the author, condenses 50 years of teaching into 25 straightforward essays on all aspects of the Alexander Technique. The book was originally designed for teachers and teachers-in-training, but has proven popular with those readers interested in learning more about this approach to changing habitual behavior.

In Thinking Aloud, Walter Carrington takes a commonsense approach to the most commonplace of problems--the ways we use ourselves in daily life. Mr. Carrington is renowned for his hands-on teaching skills. He also has a remarkable ability to communicate complex ideas in an accessible way to teachers and students alike. The reader will find the relevance of these essays reaches far beyond the confines of a specific professional training program. The fundamental ways we think and function in daily life are the true subjects of Thinking Aloud.

How we use and take time is a recurring theme throughout Thinking Aloud. If there is any ticket for admission to this book, it is that time be taken while reading each of these talks. For the interested reader--whether one sings or plays a musical instrument, sits at a computer all day, or lifts children in and out of car seats--that investment will be repaid many times over.

Reviews

These talks which impart Carrington's common sense approach to teaching the Alexander Technique, are highly accessible to all readers as an introduction for the uninitiated or as a refresher and review for the more advanced. - Impulse Magazine
This tastefully designed hardcover represents a thoughtful journey into the world of the body and it unerringly reflects our inner state. The text takes readers inside the philosophy and practice of this highly successful technique almost on a moment by moment basis; the writing is rich in subtlety with a superb appreciation for the fine detail...One needn't be a bodywork junky to appreciate the extraordinary relationship between body and mind that the author elegantly reveals. - NAPRA Review

The Author

Walter Carrington was born in 1915, the only child of the Rev. W. M. and Hannah Carrington. He was educated in the Choir School of All Saints, Margaret St., London, and St. Paul's School. He first had lessons with Mr. Alexander in 1935 and joined his Training Course in 1936, qualifying as a teacher of the Technique in 1939. From 1941 to 1946 he served as a pilot in the Royal Air Force, after which he returned to work as an Assistant Teacher; and then carried on the Training Course after Mr. Alexander's death in 1955. He and his wife Dilys are Directors of the Constructive Teaching Centre Ltd in London and he is a past Chairman of the Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique (S.T.A.T.).

Excerpt: From the essay Non-doing.

“I thought I'd talk a bit this morning about inhibition because this is a concept most easily open to misunderstanding. For a lot of people who know about the work, the whole idea of inhibition, of saying "no," can be rather off-putting. 

The general line of argument against inhibition is that most people are asleep and dozy anyway. They need stimulating and encouraging into action, rather than stopping and preventing. The whole idea of restraint also comes into play, wanting to do something and being stopped from doing it and then, perhaps, being blackmailed into the idea that you ought to restrain yourself from doing it. This attitude leads to repressing and tension and all sorts of very disagreeable things. Yet this has very little to do, in a practical way, with our concerns.

What we are trying to encourage in ourselves and in other people is the practice of non-doing. You can only practice non-doing when you've got the time and opportunity to do it. You can practice non-doing in an Alexander lesson. That's what an Alexander lesson is for, if you're on the receiving end. Everyday life, however, is very much about doing.

Rarely do people manage to stop and quiet themselves and get themselves into a situation of non-doing. Non-doing is, above all, an attitude of mind. It's a wish. It's a decision to leave everything alone and see what goes on, see what happens. Your breathing and your circulation and your postural mechanisms are all working and taking over. The organism is functioning in its automatic way, and you are doing nothing.

These talks which impart Carrington's common sense approach to teaching the Alexander Technique, are highly accessible to all readers as an introduction for the uninitiated or as a refresher and review for the more advanced. - Impulse Magazine

This tastefully designed hardcover represents a thoughtful journey into the world of the body and it unerringly reflects our inner state. The text takes readers inside the philosophy and practice of this highly successful technique almost on a moment by moment basis; the writing is rich in subtlety with a superb appreciation for the fine detail...One needn't be a bodywork junky to appreciate the extraordinary relationship between body and mind that the author elegantly reveals. - NAPRA Review

If you're going to succeed in doing nothing, you must exercise control over your thinking process. You must really wish to do nothing. If you're thinking anxious, worried thoughts, if you're thinking exciting thoughts that are irrelevant to the situation at hand, you stir up responses in your body that are not consistent with doing nothing. It's not a matter of just not moving - that can lead to fixing or freezing - it's a matter of really leaving yourself alone and letting everything just happen and take over

That is what we're aiming at in an Alexander lesson...”